Tips for Choosing the Right Gardener

As you thumb through the pages of a home and garden magazine, it’s easy to feel jealous. All the properties feature Buxus hedges trimmed to perfection, and all the flower beds are alive with colour. The lawns are always something special too - luscious and as pretty as a picture. Even the local bowling club would be envious.  

Why can’t my gardens look like that? You say. They can, but you need to choose the right gardener - one that can not only do the job but has an eye for detail and a passion for the art of gardening. Because it is an art.

If you’re ready for your own property to look like one that would feature in a magazine, then read on. Below we discover the very way to achieve that goal.

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Where to Find Gardeners in Your Area

Around 13% of Kiwis are working long hours, which leaves very little time for anything else. The time you do have to spare, you want to be doing something fun with it - not elbow deep in soil fishing out weeds.

But once you know you need to hire a gardener, where do you start to look? There isn’t anyone walking around with sandwich board signs saying, “I’m a gardener, hire me!” In the absence of such people, you need to search both locally and online.

Check out noticeboards at your local supermarket and classifieds in the newspaper. You may even find that leading auction sites such as TradeMe offer services that pique your interests.

One of the most effective gardener-finding methods, however, is through local, established lawn care businesses. You would be amazed at how quickly you can make a call and have an expert over in no time.

Take Crewcut, for example. David from Auckland is more than happy to tackle your gardens, while gardening help is only a phone call away in Nelson. Choose the experts for an expert finish.

How to Choose a Gardener?

You want your garden to be one that people admire, and it takes the right type of gardener to achieve that. That might not always be the one you first choose. The perfect gardener for you is one that takes pride in their work and has the experience to know a weed from a watsonia. It’s time to do your homework.

Take a drive or walk around town and hunt out gardens you like. Be nosy and inquire whether a gardening service provider offered the service. You never know, by the end of your adventure, you could be armed with a list of names and numbers.

Once you highlight a few options - such as those from leading garden experts in your area, then ask if they have any references. Many gardeners are only too happy to show you pictures of what they have achieved - or even take you to properties they have managed from the ground up.  

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Questions to Ask Your New Gardener

You’ll likely know when you’ve found the best gardener in your area, but it’s helpful to be sure. People’s homes are their castles, and you want only the best to maintain them. Useful questions to ask can relate both to the people’s skill set and their recommended approach. We’ve included a few helpful questions to ask below. 

  1. How often will you tend to the gardens?

  2. Do you have any recommendations for my garden?

  3. How much will your service cost?

  4. Is there anything I need to do for you?

  5. Do you take your green waste with you?

  6. Do you plant new plants?

  7. What happens during winter?  

These are just a few of the many questions you can ask your new gardener. If you require a whole new look for your yard, then it may even help to draw out a plan of what you hope to achieve. It doesn’t have to be a masterpiece, but a sketch can help you and your gardener to be on the same page.  

What Next?

You know what you want, what your garden needs, and you also know you don’t have the time to achieve it on your own. The next step is to hire a gardener that will bring your garden up to a high-quality standard. Why not get in touch with experts who know what they’re doing? Crewcut, for example, has keen gardeners all around the country who will be more than happy to take on your latest project.

Klaris Chua-Pineda